Coisa de Mulher: protetor diário e absorvente interno orgânicos


My Instagram Post 05 July 2017

Utilidade pública feminina: esses são os protetores diários e tampões da Natracare. São orgânicos, ou seja, o algodão não recebeu pesticidas e nem passou por processo de branqueamento (isto é, não tem dioxinas nem furanos, que são fatores causadores de câncer bem estabelecidos) e também são #VEGAN #CRUELTYFREE e totalmente biodegradaveis e hipoalergenicos, para quem tem alergias a roupa íntima ou produtos de higiene íntima que causam irritação e inflamação, esses produtos são a salvação da pátria, dou minha palavra.
Encontra-se na Aroma do Campo e na Lohas Store na internet.

 



The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – HeLa Cells


I’m finishing Rebecca Skloot’s account of the story behind the HeLa cells.  I can’t tell how much of my fascination with this book comes from the uncanniness of the story itself and how much comes from Skloot’s incredible mastery of the art of reporting a real story. It’s a non-fiction work but it looks like a work of  fiction when it gives each of its characters/facts a beginning, middle and end. It was so well written! Every phrase passed in front of my eyes like a scene from a film, a very sad film, where black people were relegated to medical apartheid and scientists and science played the great villain. When you work with people (and I know about that because I’m a doctor) sometimes it can be hard to balance professionalism and emotional detachment from the person who’s your work subject. It’s a thin line. I guess anyone who read the book can tell Rebecca Skloot got deeply involved with her research got emotionally involved with the Lacks family, and she pretty much wrote herself as a “character” into the book, in a very clever – and very professional – way. Congratulations to the author, it’s probably the best non-fiction book I have ever read.

 

Edited: and I should not forget to mention the book’s awesome approach to the ethics of tissue research at the end of the book.

 

HeLa Cells from Radiolab on Vimeo.

Podcast on HeLa cells from Radiolab



That’s what I was talking about (on my last post)


GoodReads Progress on HeLa

The Immortal Life of HeLa - Goodreads Progress

 

Boyfriend Cary is reading the very same book.



“The Way of All Flesh” by BBC’s Adam Curtis on “HeLa” Cells


I came to know about this video while  reading the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebbeca Skloot – page 81 of the e-book edition, to be more exact.

The video and the words below are embedded from what has been puclished on Google Video.

 

 


 

The Way of All Flesh by Adam Curtis
53:33m – 2 anos atrás

Follows the story of the cells of Henriettta Lacks. She dies in 1951 of cancer, before she died cells were removed from her body and cultivated in a laboratory in the hope that they could help find a cure for cancer. The cells (known as the HeLa line) have been growing ever since, and the scientists found that they were growing in ways they could not control.

 

 If anyone has any problem, concerning copyright, with me embedding this video on my site, please contact me and I’ll be glad to talk to you.



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